About the Author

Books by John Andrew Frederick


The King of Good Intentions II by Los Angeles songwriter and novelist John Andrew Fredrick picks up where we left off cliffhangingly, unsure whether John and Jenny, the brilliant and charming on-again/off-again couple who play in the fictitious fledgling indie band the Weird Sisters, will break up or not—as a couple or as the principal members of a getting-great band.

Reconciled after an infidelity-that-can-be-explained or at least atoned for, King II opens as the Weird Sisters are on tour during the fateful day Kurt Cobain’s suicide is announced. This undeniably hilarious sequel pits the little jangle pop band we’re rooting for against an evil record label CEO’d by a guy who believes in aliens, various nefarious bookers and sound guys, drunken “punters,” and lunatics and maniacs galore that Jenny, John, bassist Rob, and new and uproariously ridiculous new drummer Raleigh encounter on the zany road.

A quintessential L.A. novel as well, King II finds John, the not-so-humble but endearing narrator, confronted by yet another dilemma of the femme fatale kind, as well as grappling with his deepening love for and attachment to Jenny, his beautiful girlfriend and bandmate and former piano prodigy.

As II ends it sets up The Hollow Crown, a third installment—for Fredrick, without meaning to, and almost accidentally, has written a goddamn trilogy.

Author: californiacoldblood_f235xu

Wes Anderson is now seen as one of America’s greatest and most stylistic filmmakers. With movies like The Fantastic Mr. FoxThe Grand Budapest HotelMoonrise Kingdom, and The Darjeeling Limited, Anderson has solidified his place among the best and brightest of contemporary filmmakers.

Anderson’s early films, the films that rocketed him to stardom, are often written about separately and in contrast to his later films. In Fucking Innocent, John Andrew Frederick, who has taught the early films at The University of Southern California, examines Anderson’s three earliest films and discusses each individually and as the burgeoning of the art of one of the most talented of American directors.

Frederick’s criticism looks at Bottle Rocket, Rushmore, and The Royal Tennenbaums in this fun and sharp critique.

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